SERTARUL CU GANDURI

04/05/2014

Stuart A.P.Murray – „The Library”


– Highlight on Page 3:

“During the darkest days of the Great Depression, a noted bibliophile named Paul Jourdan-Smith wrote a heartfelt tribute to the eternal power of reading in which he offered a passing commentary on the continuing misery he saw everywhere around him. “This is no time for the collector to quit his books,” he observed. “He may have to quit his house, abandon his trip to Europe, and give away his car; but his books are patiently waiting to yield their comfort and provoke him to mirth. They will tell him that banks and civilizations have smashed before; governments have been on the rocks, and men have been fools in all ages. But it is all very funny. The gods laugh to see such sport, and why should we not join them?”

==========

– Highlight on Page 3

“A week after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor in 1941, the charismatic mayor of New York City, Fiorello H. La Guardia, took to the airwaves on radio station WNYC for a series of Sunday night broadcasts in which he would speak directly to his constituents, keeping them apprised of world events, giving them all an encouraging pep talk in the process. At the end of each program, it was the custom of the man affectionately known as the “Little Flower” to conclude his remarks with the words “patience and fortitude,” calm advice that he felt would see everyone safely through the long ordeal that lay ahead. So inspirational was La Guardia’s message of comfort and hope that “Patience and Fortitude” were adopted as the unofficial names of the majestic lions carved from pink Tennessee marble that guard the entryway to the New York Public Library on Fifth Avenue in Manhattan.

==========

– Highlight on Page 4

“A great library cannot be constructed,” the nineteenth-century Scottish historian John Hill Burton reminded us in The Book-Hunter, “It is the growth of ages.”

==========

– Highlight on Page 12

“Tablets were separated according to their contents and placed in different rooms: government, history, law, astronomy, geography, and so on. The contents were identified by colored marks or brief written descriptions, and sometimes by the “incipit,” or the first few words that began the text.

==========

– Highlight on Page 12

“The Nineveh library was Assurbanipal’s passion, and he sent out scribes to the distant corners of his kingdom to visit other libraries and record their contents. These were among the first library catalogs. The king also organized the copying of original literary works, for he sought to study the “artistic script of the Sumerians” and the “obscure script of the Akkadians.” In so doing, Assurbanipal hoped to obtain “the hidden treasures of the scribe’s knowledge.” Assurbanipal’s library also held the Gilgamesh Epic.

==========

– Highlight on Page 12

“By 3000 BCE Egyptians had developed hieroglyphics, which combines pictographs with symbols (glyphs) that represent syllables when spoken aloud. Hieroglyphics means “sacred engraving,” the term given to this form of writing by Greeks, who discovered examples of it in Egyptian temples and funeral sites. There are some six thousand known hieroglyphs from Egypt, where they were in use until the fourth century.

==========

– Highlight on Page 14

The English term “library” derives from liber, Latin for “book.” The Greek term for a papyrus roll is biblion, and a container for storing rolls is called a bibliotheke. In some languages, the word for library is a variant of bibliotheke, a place where books are kept.

==========

– Highlight on Page 15

The profession of scribe was a difficult one, its demands all-consuming, as exemplified by what an Egyptian instructor told his student: “I shall make thee love writing more than thine own mother.”

==========

– Highlight on Page 15

Legend has it that when the preeminence of Egypt’s Alexandria library was challenged by a new library at Pergamum in Asia Minor, the Egyptians refused to export papyrus to their competitors. As a result, Pergamum developed a writing material of its own, made from the skin of calves, sheep, and goats, called parchment (it is pergamenum in Latin and pergament in Germanic languages, harking back to its origins in Pergamum). Parchment’s smooth surface took ink and paint better than papyrus, facilitating beautiful designs and calligraphy on the book page, and it was also more durable. The finest quality parchment is vellum, generally made from calfskin.

==========

– Highlight on Page 16

The Greeks were the first to establish libraries for the public, not just for the ruling elite. By 500 BCE, Athens and Sámos were developing public libraries; however, the majority of people could not read, so even these early public libraries served just a small part of the population.

==========

– Highlight on Page 16

Greek city-states founded specialized libraries for medicine, philosophy, and the sciences.

==========

– Highlight on Page 16

The scholars Plato, Euripides, Thucydides, and Herodotus owned large personal libraries, pioneering a custom that blossomed in Roman days, when beautiful private libraries were essential centerpieces in the homes of the wealthy and the noble class.

==========

– Highlight on Page 17

The most renowned cultural treasure of Alexandria was its Great Library, or Royal Library, established by Ptolemy I Soter, a Macedonian general who assumed kingship of Egypt upon Alexander’s death. Ptolemy’s Alexandrian library was founded by 300 BCE and became a world center for scholarship, literature, and books. The Great Library acquired—often by laborious copying of originals—the largest holdings of the age, although historians debate the precise number of scrolls. The highest estimates claim 400,000 scrolls at the Great Library, while the most conservative estimates are as low as 40,000, which is still an enormous collection that required vast storage space.

==========

– Highlight on Page 18

The Alexandrian Great Library was essentially a temple, dedicated to the Nine Muses, the goddesses of the arts—among them poetry, music, singing, and oratory. A building so dedicated was more than a place for records and books, but was termed a museum, a place of the Muses, a place of culture.

==========

– Highlight on Page 19

Alexandria’s library administrators collected scrolls from all over the world and organized and copied them—not always returning those they borrowed. In one notorious case, Athens loaned the library some extremely important original scrolls so they might be copied, and, as a guarantee of their return, Alexandria gave an enormous sum in gold to the people of Athens. Alexandria’s desire for original books was so strong, however, that only the new copies were shipped back to the Athenians, who had to be content with keeping the gold and the copies.

==========

– Highlight on Page 20

With a unique written language, Ge’ez, Aksum possessed its own translation of the Bible, and its libraries contained important Christian documents. Many such works were translated by Aksum’s Coptic monks between the fifth and seventh centuries. The pre-Christian Book of Enoch exists only in Ge’ez.

==========

– Highlight on Page 21

In the fourth century, Aksum became the first significant empire to accept Christianity when King Ezana (320-350) was converted by his slave-teacher, Frumentius (d. 383), a Greek Phoenician. The zeal of Frumentius for proselytizing the people of the Red Sea persuaded the Patriarch of Alexandria to ordain him Bishop of Aksum.

==========

– Highlight on Page 22

Emperors Augustus, Tiberius, Vespasian, and Trajan all created great libraries, emulating Julius Caesar, the first emperor who aspired to establish a library for the public. Caesar’s assassination in 44 BCE cut short his ambitions, but his successors built public and private libraries with books gathered from around the empire.

==========

– Highlight on Page 23

Among the greatest achievements of these far-flung scriptoria, from Britain to the Black Sea, was the advance of the art of illumination. Bookmaking moved from papyrus scrolls to vellum bound pages inscribed on both sides—and new arts arose in the craft of bookbinding, calligraphy, and design.

==========

– Highlight on Page 25

The Romans invented the codex form of the book, folding the scroll into pages which made reading and handling the document much easier. Legend has it that Julius Caesar was the first to fold scrolls, concertina-fashion, for dispatches to his forces campaigning in Gaul. Scrolls were awkward to read if a reader wished to consult material at opposite ends of the document. Further, scrolls were written only on one side, while both sides of the codex page were used. Eventually, the folds were cut into sheets, or “leaves,” and bound together along one edge. The bound pages were protected by stiff covers, usually of wood enclosed with leather. Codex is Latin for a “block of wood”; the Latin liber, the root of “library,” and the German Buch, the source of “book,” both refer to wood. The codex was not only easier to handle than the scroll, but it also fit conveniently on library shelves. The spine generally held the book’s title, facing out, affording easier organization of the collection. The term codex technically refers only to manuscript books—those that, at one time, were handwritten. More specifically, a codex is the term used primarily for a bound manuscript from Roman times up through the Middle Ages.

==========

– Highlight on Page 26

The scroll remained a symbol of Judaism, however, with the Laws of Moses inscribed on the Torah scroll—the most sacred document of the Jews.

==========

– Highlight on Page 27

The sixth-century Order of Saint Benedict, adherents of Italian priest Benedict of Nursia (480-543), became the most influential with regard to the world of books and libraries. Their own guidebook, Rule of Monks, set out the principles and duties of the monastic community, advising members to practice moderation in all things—eating , religious devotion, and fasting—and to read every day. The Rule of Monks required each monastery to have at least one book for every brother.

==========

– Highlight on Page 27

The Benedictines established monasteries throughout Europe, from southern Italy to islands off Scotland. Many monasteries began to build libraries, with the most notable at Monte Cassino and Bobbio in Italy; Fulda and Corvey in Germany; St. Gall in Switzerland; and Canterbury, Wearmouth, and Jarrow, in England. The first monastery libraries usually had fewer than a hundred books, and collections of three hundred were considered remarkably large. Many titles were duplicates, produced by and for the community.

==========

– Highlight on Page 28

Benedictine scriptoria became the most productive of the Middle Ages, as their far-flung monasteries industriously turned out copies of important titles—at first mostly theological.

==========

– Highlight on Page 29

In the ninth century, after conquering much of Western Europe, Charlemagne (742-814), king of the Franks, encouraged a rejuvenation of scholarship and intellectualism. A true bibliophile, Charlemagne urged clerics to pursue the “study of letters,” to teach grammar and music, and to translate Christian creed and prayers into the vernacular. So much copying was accomplished as a result of this royal exhortation that virtually every ancient European manuscript that had survived until then was likely to be preserved.

==========

– Highlight on Page 30

A substantial monastery might have as many as forty scribes at work in its scriptoria, the average scribe copying two books a year.

==========

– Highlight on Page 34

A library’s most-used books were not only chained to desks and lecterns to prevent theft, but they were often protected by a “book curse” to scourge whoever damaged or stole them. After finishing the copying, the scribe usually added such a curse to the final page, warning that eternal damnation or prolonged physical suffering awaited any would-be perpetrator. Book curses are as old as writing—or at least as old as libraries. For all the reputed propriety and patience required of their calling, librarians have historically wished the worst of punishments on book thieves, as if they were no better than murderers or blasphemers.

==========

– Highlight on Page 35

The scribe who completed the last book of the Bible, entitled Revelation, closed with a fiery admonition against altering what had been written: I warn everyone who hears the words of the prophecy of this book: if any one adds to them, God will add to him the plagues described in this book, and if any one takes away from the words of the book of this prophecy, God will take away his share in the tree of life and in the holy city, which are described in this book.

==========

– Highlight on Page 38

The Chinese achieved an early form of printing by pushing soft paper into the stone text and applying ink to the back of the sheet. The result, when the paper was withdrawn, was a black background with white letters. Many Confucian adherents made personal copies of the classics by this “stone-rubbing” method.

==========

– Highlight on Page 38

Movable type—single letters or characters that can be placed alongside others in a printing form, or frame—was first developed in China in the eleventh century. Three centuries later, the Koreans established the first type foundry for casting movable type in metal, and Japan soon followed suit. Movable type did not, however, permanently catch on in East Asia. For centuries, woodblocks remained the leading printing method in China, Korea, and Japan.

==========

– Highlight on Page 41

One of the most remarkable Asian libraries was hidden away for centuries in western China in the Mogao Grottoes, which became known as the “Caves of the Thousand Buddhas.”

==========

– Highlight on Page 44

In 1258, Mongol hordes destroyed Baghdad and its thirty-six public libraries, the pillagers tearing books apart so the leather covers could be used for sandals.

==========

– Highlight on Page 46

By the tenth century, many Islamic cities had major libraries, and one of the largest, with an estimated 400,000 to 600,000 books, was at Cordoba, capital of Al-Andalus, the Muslim-ruled lands of the Iberian Peninsula. The oldest mosque library, and among the most important, was the Sufiya in Aleppo, northern Syria, where a local prince had personally bequeathed 10,000 titles.

==========

– Highlight on Page 46

Among the most legendary libraries was that of the Persian city of Shiraz, where there were more than three hundred chambers furnished with plush carpets. The library had thorough catalogs to help in locating texts, which were kept in the storage chambers and organized according to “every branch of learning.”

==========

– Highlight on Page 47

Much cheaper and easier to produce than parchment or vellum, paper revolutionized book manufacture and stimulated production. For example, up to 40 percent of the cost of a book made in Constantinople had been in the parchment alone. The increased use of paper drastically reduced publishing costs. A skilled papermaker could turn out thousands of sheets in the time that a few skins could be made into vellum or parchment.

==========

– Highlight on Page 49

As humanists built book collections and university libraries developed, the book trade grew to meet this unprecedented demand for reading matter. Around 1450, impelled by the need for books, Johann Gutenberg (c. 1400- 1468) developed the printing press in Germany. Within fifty years, millions of printed books were in circulation across Europe.

==========

– Highlight on Page 49

One of the finest cathedral schools was at York in northern England. Founded in the seventh century, York was known for teaching theology as well as the seven liberal arts: grammar, rhetoric, logic, geometry, arithmetic, music, and astronomy. York won fame because of its administrator, Flaccus Alcuinus (c. 735-804). Known as Alcuin, this teacher, scholar, and poet was instrumental in preparing the way for the development of university education in Europe.

==========

– Highlight on Page 50

“Faith is a free act of the will, not a forced act,” Alcuin told Charlemagne when discussing the subject of compulsory baptism. “You can force people to be baptized, but you cannot force them to believe.”

==========

– Highlight on Page 53

Since the seventh century, parts of the Bible had been translated into Old English, but it was not until the close of the fourteenth century that a full Middle English translation appeared. English theologian and lay preacher, John Wycliffe (c. 1325-1384), led the efforts of this first translation of the Bible into vernacular English in 1382.

==========

– Highlight on Page 54

Humanism was especially strong in Italy, where the scholar Francesco Petrarch (1304-74) was one of the movement’s founders. An important book collector, Petrarch searched for manuscripts of classical writings and personally copied them for his own library, which he referred to as “my daughter.” He bequeathed his collection to Venice, where it became the foundation of a future public library.

==========

– Highlight on Page 55

Bibliophiles, such as Petrarch’s acquaintance, English bishop Richard de Bury (1281-1345), gathered books (manuscripts) wherever and however they could. De Bury was a tutor of royalty as well as a diplomat and clergyman. As a high official of King Edward III, de Bury was showered with gifts and bribes from those who desired his favor and influence with the royal court. The best bribe, however, was a book. He wrote: Indeed, if we had loved gold and silver goblets, high-bred horses, or no small sums of money, we might in those days have furnished forth a rich treasury. But in truth we wanted manuscripts, not moneyscripts; we loved codices more than florins, and preferred slender pamphlets to pampered palfreys.

==========

– Highlight on Page 57

One estimate calculates that 40,000 book editions had been published by the start of the sixteenth century. Figuring an average print run of 500 copies of each edition, as many as 20 million books could have been printed. Although half the titles were Bibles or Christian texts, many were literary works by the likes of Italian poet, Dante Alighieri, and England’s Chaucer. Other titles offered valuable scientific and historical information, until then impossible to find without hunting endlessly through libraries and archives.

==========

– Highlight on Page 62

Hungary’s fifteenth-century king, Matthias Corvinus (1443-90), built a great library of three thousand titles in his capital city of Buda, on the Danube. His royal court had a number of Italian humanists who—along with his queen Beatrice of Naples (1457-1508), a humanist and book lover—guided the establishment of the Corvinian Library.

==========

– Highlight on Page 64

The Dutch philosopher and scholar, Erasmus—consultant to publisher Aldus—expressed the sentiments of many who were passionate about books: “When I get a little money I buy books; and if any is left, I buy food and clothes.”

==========

– Highlight on Page 65

That books served various intellectual functions is suggested by the English jurist, statesman, scientist, author, and philosopher, Sir Francis Bacon (1561-1626): “Some books are to be tasted; others swallowed; and some few to be chewed and digested.” Danish physician A. Bartholini (1597- 1643), who was devoted to literature, wrote: “Without books, God is silent, justice dormant, natural science at a stand, philosophy lame, letters dumb, and all things involved in darkness.”

==========

– Highlight on Page 66

One of Europe’s finest church libraries, that of the Monastero di San Nicholas di Casole in Italy, would not survive. It was destroyed during a 1480 massacre by the Ottoman Turks.

==========

– Highlight on Page 66

Perhaps the greatest court library was that of the Vatican in Rome, after it was renewed by Pope Nicholas V (1398-1455). The papal library had languished for a century until Nicholas (Tomaso Parentucelli) came to the throne and contributed hundreds of his own manuscripts to the collection.

==========

– Highlight on Page 67

As his Vatican librarian, Nicholas appointed scholar Giovanni Andrea Bussi (1417-75), editor of many classical texts. Bussi acquired titles by using the particularly effective method of ordering monasteries to give up any works he or Nicholas wanted for the collection. Vatican agents traveled around Europe, searching monasteries and private libraries for rare or otherwise important manuscripts, buying and selling as they went. Titles were often found in some dusty corner of a neglected monastic library. They might be purchased outright or borrowed for copying.

==========

– Highlight on Page 70

The Sorbonne library in Paris was among the first to list titles alphabetically under each subject area. This cataloging organization was an improvement, but became cumbersome as the library grew. New acquisitions had to be entered in the margins of the catalog list until a new catalog was laboriously compiled. Further, it was common for several books to be bound in one volume, whose cover bore only the title of the first work. If the librarians were unfamiliar with the volume’s contents, most of its works would likely be forgotten—unless the library possessed an in-depth catalog.

==========

– Highlight on Page 71

A physician and naturalist who compiled a Greek-Latin dictionary at the age of twenty-one, Gesner produced the Bibliotheca universalis in 1545. This Universal Bibliography listed 10,000 titles by 1,800 authors (including all known Latin, Greek, and Hebrew writers). A companion to the Bibliotheca universalis was published in 1548, with 30,000 entries, cross-referenced and grouped under appropriate subheadings. Known as the “father of bibliography,” Gesner’s work remained invaluable to librarians for centuries.

==========

– Highlight on Page 73

Confiscation of monastic property, in particular their libraries and scriptoria, took place in many Protestant lands, such as Sweden, Switzerland, and Denmark. The Jesuits, whose libraries were among the best, suffered especially severe losses. Religious conflict also swept through England, where reformers had the upper

==========

– Highlight on Page 74

The “Suppression of the Monasteries” between 1536 and 1541 was part of a methodical campaign to eradicate Catholic monasticism in England, Wales, and Ireland. King Henry VIII considered the links of many monasteries and abbeys to the French monarchy (whose throne he claimed) as a threat to his reign. If monasteries could afford to pay royal fines, however, they were allowed to carry on. In the 1530s more than 300 monasteries were threatened with dissolution, but approximately 70 were able to pay the fines and avoid being shut down.

==========

– Highlight on Page 76

The great Kurdish leader and bibliophile, Saladin (c. 1138-93), presaged his defeat of Crusader kingdoms in the Holy Lands by first wresting control of Egypt from the Islamic Fatimid dynasty at Cairo. He promptly incorporated the most valuable Fatimid books into his own private collection, and allowed his viziers (ministers or advisors) to take what they wished from the rest. Saladin continued this custom whenever he captured a city. One vizier amassed 30,000 books—not all plunder, however, for many were purchased or commissioned from copyists.

==========

– Highlight on Page 88

Among the significant Ottoman library developments was the 1678 establishment of a major library in a dedicated building in Constantinople. Also, the magnificent Topkapi Palace was simultaneously building up the largest collection of illuminated Arabic manuscripts in the world.

==========

– Highlight on Page 88

Mechanical printing presses would not be employed by most Muslims for two more centuries because Islam favored elegant handwritten works over machine duplication. The transcendent value of such books to Ottoman bibliophiles was attested to by “mausoleum libraries,” book collections built beside the deceased owner’s place of eternal rest.

==========

– Highlight on Page 81

In India, the powerful Islamic dynasty known as the Delhi Sultanate, which reigned between the thirteenth and sixteenth centuries, developed several types of libraries. These included the Khangah (or Sufi) library; large court libraries; and academic, mosque, and private libraries.

==========

– Highlight on Page 82

The sack of Baghdad in 1258 sent surviving Islamic scholars, doctors, writers, architects, teachers, and musicians to Delhi, which became the great center of Islamic culture.

==========

– Highlight on Page 90

The Malays also followed traditional Muslim methods of book design and layout—symmetrically decorated double pages and beautifully illuminated colophons (brief, informative texts about the book or author).

==========

– Highlight on Page 91

The era spanning the tenth to seventeenth centuries is known as China’s “period of encyclopedists.” The government employed many hundreds of scholars to compile massive encyclopedias of collected knowledge, the largest of which—completed in 1408—totaled almost 23,000 folio volumes in manuscript form.

==========

– Highlight on Page 91

The fifteenth-century Yi dynasty established the Korean alphabet, Hangul, expressly for teaching, and it was a key contribution to the growth of libraries and archives in the country. The Korean royal libraries classified titles as classics, history, philosophy, and encyclopedias.

==========

– Highlight on Page 92

The Tokugawa family came to power in 1603, beginning a more peaceful age in which the country was governed by a shogun, meaning “commander of the armies.” With Japan at peace, warriors and warlords often turned to reading for intellectual development. Book learning increased and libraries grew, especially those of the exclusive schools for children of leading families. Japanese libraries were, regretfully, not for the people.

==========

– Highlight on Page 93

The Francis Trigge Chained Library in Grantham, Lincolnshire, is considered the ancestor of the public libraries that followed it, largely because its patrons were not required to be members of an institution, such as a college or a church. Trigge (c. 1547-1606), rector of Welbourne, established the library in 1598 in a room over St. Wulfram’s Church, decreeing it should be open to the clergy and residents of the neighborhood. The borough provided furnishings, and Trigge provided a hundred pounds to buy books.

==========

– Highlight on Page 94

Europe was especially decimated during the final conflict, the Thirty Years’ War of 1618-48. Her population declined from 21 million in 1618 to 13 million by war’s end. Many of the deaths were caused by famine and disease. Much of Germany was devastated, from the Baltic Sea in the north, to Munich in the south.

==========

– Highlight on Page 95

Sweden’s King Gustavus Adolphus (1594-1632), a Protestant, virtually emptied libraries in his army’s path. The king donated these books to many a budding Swedish library, and he improved the Royal Library; but the largest consignment came to rest in the university library at Uppsala, founded during this age of upheaval. Specially targeted by Gustavus Adolphus’s raiders were the schools, seminaries, and colleges of the Jesuit order. Devoted to intellectual pursuits, including education and preaching, the Jesuits possessed fine book collections that became valuable prizes.

==========

– Highlight on Page 95

The Vatican acquired the Palatine Library of Heidelberg University in 1623, spoils won by a Bavarian noble who had each book rebound, making sure to include an inscription that announced he had taken it “as a prize of war from captured Heidelberg” and sent “as a trophy” to the pope.

==========

– Highlight on Page 96

Library collections were always at risk, and many succumbed to fires, both accidental and suspicious. Untold numbers ofbooks were burned up in the 1666 Great Fire of London, which destroyed 13,000 houses and 87 parish churches, as well as old St. Paul’s Cathedral with its venerable ecclesiastical library.

==========

– Highlight on Page 97

Book-buying agents, book collectors, scholars, writers, printers, and publishers made their way to the fairs to buy and sell and learn what was new. Frankfurt and Leipzig held the most prominent book fairs, followed by Basel, Geneva, Paris, and Antwerp.

==========

– Highlight on Page 97

The line of eminent figures essential to the development and administration of libraries continued with French scholar and physician Gabriel Naudé (1600-53). Author of the seminal work on library science, Advice on Establishing a Library, Naudé instructed private collectors on how many books were practical (which depended on the collector’s wealth and ability to maintain them), how to select and acquire titles, and how to create catalogs.

==========

– Highlight on Page 98

Arranging a library well is essential, Naudé said, quoting ancient Rome’s Cicero: “It is order that gives light to memory.”

==========

– Highlight on Page 103

The Bodleian Library, as it came to be known, was the first of its kind officially designated to receive “legal deposit” copies of every recently published title, a means of maintaining accurate government records on book publishing. The library was open six hours a day (except Sundays). The first librarian, Thomas James (c. 1573-1629), wrote, “The like Librarie is no where to be found.”

==========

– Highlight on Page 103

Bodley worked daily at his chosen life’s task despite persistent weak health. He saw to it that the library would have one of the best catalogs of the day. He was knighted by the scholarly King James I, who remarked on a visit in 1605 that the library founder should have been named “Godly” rather than Bodley.

==========

– Highlight on Page 104

Francis Bacon (1561-1626), English jurist, philosopher, and scientist, was a patron of the Bodleian and Cottonian. Bacon expressed the veneration he felt for noble libraries, which he considered sanctified places: “Libraries are as the shrines where all the relics of saints, full of true virtue, and that without delusion or imposture, are preserved and reposed.”

==========

– Highlight on Page 107

The British civil conflicts between the forces of the monarchy and Parliament exacted their own price in library destruction. Yet, Puritan champion Oliver Cromwell was a benefactor of libraries after the Royalists were defeated, and he came to power in 1653 as Lord Protector. At the death of James Ussher (1581-1656), Anglo-Irish book collector and Archbishop of Armagh, his library was about to be sold to the king of Denmark, or to Cardinal Mazarin—that is, until Cromwell stepped in and forbade it. Instead, Ussher’s collection was acquired by the parliamentary army in Ireland and, in 1661, became part of the library of Trinity College, Dublin. Trinity’s library was immediately elevated in stature and was destined to become one of the world’s finest.

==========

– Highlight on Page 108

Another controversial English author, Jonathan Swift (1667-1745), contributed mightily to the deluge of popular literature. Swift’s 1726 satirical novel, Gulliver’s Travels, was “universally read, from the cabinet council to the nursery,” according to a friend. Sensing an immediate best-seller—and determined to keep ahead of book pirates—Swift’s publisher had five printing houses produce the first edition simultaneously. Since then, Gulliver’s Travels has always remained in print, although governments and religions, skewered by his wit, would have preferred banning it.

==========

– Highlight on Page 111

Ironically, what the Spanish were eradicating was, in fact, a biased Aztec version of history. The Aztecs, themselves, had tried to wipe out Mayan culture and traditions previous to the Spaniards’ arrival. By the time Cortés arrived, the Aztecs had dominated the Mayans and Mesoamerica for about a century. In those, years the Aztecs had destroyed Mayan books and documents and replaced them with new works and a false history that portrayed the Aztecs as rightful rulers. Now, the Aztec books were, in turn, destroyed by Cortés and his priests.

==========

– Highlight on Page 112

Within a few years, the Spanish realized the immense value of these books, which were filled with precolonial history, genealogies, land claims, astronomy, poetry, and medicine. The surviving volumes were collected and copied, and Spanish priests and scholars collaborated with native scribes, who were taught the Roman alphabet in order to translate them.

==========

– Highlight on Page 113

Sister Juana wrote: “Oh, how much harm would be avoided in our country” if there were women to teach women rather than risking the hazards of male instructors being placed in intimate settings with girl students. Many fathers refused their daughters an education for just this reason. Sister Juana said that such risks “would be eliminated if there were older women of learning, as Saint Paul desires, and instruction were passed down from one group to another, as in the case with needlework and other traditional activities.” For her outspoken defiance, Sister Juana was punished, commanded in 1691 to stop writing, and forbidden to use her beloved library. Next, her books and her musical and scientific instruments were confiscated. She died four years later. Hispanic literary tradition ranks Sister Juana as a major figure, known even in her own time as the “Mexican Phoenix,” a flame rising from the ashes of religious authoritarianism.

==========

– Highlight on Page 113

Spanish America led the way in book publishing, as the New World’s first printing press was set up in Mexico, where in 1539 the first North American title was printed. This was a book of religious instruction, written in both Spanish and native Nahuatl. No British colonial titles were published until the mid-1600s. The first printing press in the English-speaking colonies arrived in Massachusetts in 1638, and was set up in the home of Henry Dunster, first president of Harvard College in Cambridge. In 1663 this shop produced the earliest Bible published in British North America. As with the first Spanish book, it was intended for native readers and was the first book printed wholly in a Native American language—Algonquian.

==========

– Highlight on Page 114

To the north, New France possessed no printing presses, its culture and economy tightly controlled by a dictatorial governor based in Quebec. Canada’s small population of native peoples and French colonials were mainly employed in producing furs and lumber for the profit of the crown. There were only 2,200 Europeans in New France in 1663, when Quebec’s Jesuit seminary, Laval College, established the first Canadian library—one of the oldest in North America.

==========

– Highlight on Page 115

English engraver and type caster William Caslon had designed the typeface that became the most popular in North America. Widely used in books and newspapers, Caslon type was used for the Declaration of Independence in 1776.

==========

– Highlight on Page 117

In 1638 British America’s first institutional library was established in Massachusetts as the foundation of Harvard University. Harvard’s library was founded by a donation of books from a clergyman intent on propagating his faith. Puritan minister John Harvard left his estate and four hundred volumes to a seminary starting up in Newtowne, a village near Boston. Harvard’s library consisted mostly of theological titles, with some Greek and Roman classics. The collection was invaluable to the school, which immediately attained credibility as a place of learning. The seminary was named in Harvard’s honor, and Newtowne was renamed after Cambridge, England, where he had earned his degree before immigrating to the colony in 1637.

==========

– Highlight on Page 117

Harvard allowed patrons to borrow or return books only on Friday mornings, when three titles could be taken and kept for up to six weeks. In those times, an education depended more on textbooks and lectures than on the library. For those who tried to read in the library, no candles or lamps were allowed, in order to minimize the danger of another fire. Whenever a fire was burning in the hearth, the librarian or an assistant had to be present at all times.

==========

– Highlight on Page 118

For all its success, Harvard’s library grew relatively slowly, with only 20,000 titles at the close of the eighteenth century. Major European university libraries of this era had 200,000 titles. This shortcoming was cause for complaint among contemporary students and graduates, who would eventually see to it that Harvard Library grew to become the largest private collection in America by the late nineteenth century, with almost 230,000 books.

==========

– Highlight on Page 120

In 1731, fifty founding members contributed funds to establish the Library Company of Philadelphia, which, for Franklin, was “[his] first project of a public nature.” Membership increased to one hundred subscribers, who paid an initial fee and annual dues. The idea caught on across the colonies, and by the 1750s a dozen new subscription libraries had appeared, established in Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Massachusetts, New York, Connecticut, and Maine. By contrast, the first British subscription library was not established until 1756.

==========

– Highlight on Page 121

Permanent library quarters were built in 1791, when Philadelphia was temporarily the nation’s capital. The Library Company served as the library for members of Congress until the establishment, in 1800, of the new capital at Washington, D.C.

==========

– Highlight on Page 124

When, in 1800, the United States established its capital city at Washington, D.C., the government also established the Library of Congress. This library was soon destroyed by the British during the War of 1812, but rebuilding began immediately. Even as the Library of Congress was literally rising from the ashes, a vision of what it could be was expressed in an 1815 editorial in the National Intelligencer: “In a country of such general intelligence as this, the Congressional or National Library of the United States [should] become the great repository of the literature of the world.”

==========

– Highlight on Page 125

In April 1800, president John Adams approved legislation to transfer the government from Philadelphia to Washington, D.C., which now officially became the nation’s capital. In this same act was the authorization to establish the Library of Congress.

==========

The act called for a library containing “such books as may be necessary for the use of Congress—and for putting up a suitable apartment for containing them therein. . . .” The congressional Joint Committee on the Library was created by this act, and, in 1811, the committee was officially made permanent. It is Congress’s oldest continuing joint

==========

– Highlight on Page 126

Thomas Jefferson became president in 1801 and took great interest in the library, often recommending books to acquire. Jefferson had a large library of his own and was known for buying books on his visits to Europe. In 1802, an act of Congress authorized the president to name the first Librarian of Congress, and gave itself power to establish library rules and regulations. This act also granted the president and vice president the right to use the library.

==========

– Highlight on Page 126

Then, in August 1814, during the War of 1812, a British invasion force captured Washington and torched the Capitol building. The Library of Congress was destroyed in the conflagration.

==========

– Highlight on Page 129

In January 1815, Congress purchased Jefferson’s 6,487 volumes appraised at $23,950, more than doubling the congressional library’s original size. Further, the Library of Congress was transformed from a special library of books on law, economics, and history to become a general library, the result of Jefferson’s personal interests being so broad. One of the most influential political philosophers of the age, Jefferson was fluent in several languages and a skilled architect. Mainly self-educated, his education had come from his books, which composed one of the finest private libraries in North America. He described his library as containing everything “chiefly valuable in science and literature.”

==========

– Highlight on Page 133

Throughout the next fifty years, the Boston Athenaeum was the premier center of Boston’s intellectual and cultural life. By 1851 it was one of the five largest libraries in the United States.

==========

– Highlight on Page 134

Boston Public Library became a leading model for the modern urban public library. Following European library policy, Boston Public had noncirculating, “reserved” scholarly books that were not to be borrowed, but patrons were permitted to take out popular titles at no charge. This “reference books” policy soon became a widely followed standard in the United States and Canada.

==========

– Highlight on Page 143

State libraries began to appear in the 1800s, often as collections of reference books for their legislative bodies. These libraries grew slowly, supported inadequately at first. Pennsylvania’s was the first true state library, established in 1816, soon followed by Ohio, New Hampshire, Illinois, and New York (all created by 1818). The U.S. Bureau of Education produced a national survey in 1876 that reported every state and territory as having an official library, though these were made up of mainly law collections.

==========

– Highlight on Page 147

Carnegie made his fortune in the Allegheny-Pittsburgh region, largely from steel producing and construction. By 1870, at the age of thirty-three, he had resolved to keep only $50,000 a year from his earnings, and to “make no effort to increase fortune but spend the surplus each year for benevolent purposes. Cast aside business forever except for others.” This was Carnegie’s “Gospel of Wealth,” and in his lifetime, he gave away more than $333 million—90 percent of his fortune. He believed the rich should live without extravagance, provide moderately for the needs of their dependents, and distribute their “surplus” funds for the benefit of the common man—especially to help those who endeavored to educate themselves. Library construction was part of his vision for “the improvement of mankind.”

==========

– Highlight on Page 150

Carnegie’s open-stack approach was in keeping with the latest American library thinking, as expressed by John Cotton Dana (1856-1929) in his 1899 A Library Primer, written to teach “library management for the small library, and to show how large it is and how much librarians have yet to learn and to do.” Cotton was emphatic about patrons being permitted to browse stacks: Let the shelves be open, and the public admitted to them, and let the open shelves strike the keynote of the whole administration. The whole library should be permeated with a cheerful and accommodating atmosphere.

==========

– Highlight on Page 158

The first known circulating library that loaned books for a fee was most likely that of Scottish poet Allan Ramsay, who rented titles from his Edinburgh shop early in the eighteenth century.

==========

– Highlight on Page 158

Circulating libraries in Britain, America, and parts of Europe were crucial to the spread of literacy and the love of books and reading, as expressed by English essayist Charles Lamb (1775-1834): “I love to lose myself in other men’s minds. When I am not walking, I am reading. I cannot sit and think; books think for me.”

==========

– Highlight on Page 158

In 1850, the process of founding public libraries was initiated by the British Parliament, which passed the Public Libraries Act. This act authorized municipalities with a population of 100,000 or more to levy a tax to build a public library—although they could not buy books with that money. Norwich, England, was the first city to adopt the act, and the eleventh in the country to open a public library (the first was in Winchester, England).

==========

– Highlight on Page 170

In other and completely separate Asian library developments, the world’s largest book was literally “built” as part of the Kuthodaw pagoda in Mandalay, Myanmar (Burma). Constructed between 1860 and 1868, the book consists of more than seven hundred marble tablets inscribed with Buddhist teachings—originally in gold, which has long since been removed. Each tablet, three and a half feet wide by five tall and five inches thick, stands in its own stupa, or cave-like structure, containing Buddhist relics.

==========

– Highlight on Page 172

Li Dazhao (1888-1927), who studied in Japan and in 1921 was co-founder of the Chinese Communist Party (CCP), was the university’s head librarian for much of this period. In 1927, Li was executed for radicalism by a regional warlord. It was Li’s assistant and intellectual adherent at the university library who would play the dominant role in China’s mid-twentieth-century revolutionary history: Mao Zedong (1893-1976). Destined to become chairman of the CCP and founder of the People’s Republic of China, Mao was strongly influenced by Li Dazhao. Mao’s mentor and fellow librarian advocated armed revolution, which would have to originate with the Chinese peasantry, who would be educated in the Communist doctrine found in books.

==========

– Highlight on Page 173

The Japanese invasion of China in the 1930s, however, dealt a crushing blow to the progress of Chinese libraries. More than 2.7 million books were lost during the years of Japanese occupation, almost half of China’s total stock of books. After the Japanese surrender in 1945, libraries continued to suffer in the almost five years of civil war between the Communists and Nationalists. There were only fifty-five public libraries of any size in China when the People’s Republic was established in 1949.

==========

– Highlight on Page 173

Since the death of Mao in 1976, and because of the opening and reform movement launched in 1978—largely by Deng Xiaoping (1904-97)—Chinese libraries have boomed. They have added materials on economics and finance, and are no longer restricted to the writings of approved Communist theorists.

==========

– Highlight on Page 174

The National Diet Library was established in 1948, its facilities divided between Tokyo and Kyoto. The library was originally founded for the policy and legislation research of Japan’s parliamentary body, much like the American Library of Congress.

==========

– Highlight on Page 176

Since the Thirty Years’ War of the seventeenth century, few decades have seen the immense destruction of libraries that occurred between 1914 and 1945, an era of two world wars. Germany and much of Europe were spared library losses in World War I—northern France, Belgium, Russia, and the Italian-Austrian border were the most populated European theaters of war. In World War II, however, heavy aerial bombardment destroyed many libraries in many regions of the world.

==========

– Highlight on Page 177

In 1992, as Yugoslavia disintegrated, the newly founded Serbian Republic of Bosnia and Herzegovina sent forces to lay siege to Sarajevo, stronghold of the independent Republic of Bosnia-Herzegovina. The National University Library, a prominent symbol of Bosnia-Herzegovina’s identity, was targeted by Serb artillery in a three-day bombardment that reduced 90 percent of its 1.5 million books to ashes. As the fire raged, hundreds of Sarajevans struggled to rescue what they could, saving 100,000 volumes.

==========

– Highlight on Page 182

In the second half of the nineteenth century, librarian Ainsworth Spofford steered the LoC into becoming a truly national library for all Americans. Yet its collections are not limited to Americana; rather, they are universal, encompassing some 450 languages. The library grew to occupy three massive buildings in Washington, with 530 miles of shelf space—more than any other library. Such space is needed to accommodate the 22,000 items published in the United States, which arrive every workday. An average of 10,000 items is added daily. The rest are traded with other libraries, distributed throughout government agencies, or donated to schools.

==========

– Highlight on Page 190

The largest library in Austria, located in Vienna’s Hofburg Palace, the interior of the national library is one of the most beautiful in the world. Aptly named the Prunksaal—ceremonial or “splendor” hall—the heart of the library has been described by library historians as “incomparable” and “astonishing.” Its lavish eighteenth-century splendor is considered a masterpiece of baroque Austrian architecture.

==========

Reclame

04/02/2012

SCORPION – Horoscop literar.


Kircher's Zodiac

Kircher's Zodiac

  

   „Cum? Gândiţi oare că atâtea mii de stele strălucesc pe  degeaba?” se mira Seneca, unul dintre filozofii care credeau că astrele influenţează destinul omului. „Urmez multitudinea înşiruirii de stele în cursa lor circulară” spunea Ptolemeu, atent deopotrivă la ce se întâmplă pe bolta mişcătoare şi la ce se întâmplă pe Pământ. În schimb, Schopenhauer vedea în astrologie o dovadă a „subiectivităţii jalnice a oamenilor”, care raportează cursa astrelor în univers „la micul lor eu” şi pun în relaţie cerul plin de constelaţii cu pământul plin de ticăloşi.

   Cu capul în stele şi cu ochii în carte, Zodierul schimbă foaia de calendar, după mirările omului modern: „Cum? Gândiţi oare că atâtea mii de cărţi strălucesc pe degeaba?”  Fie ca în anul care vine să fiţi sănătoşi, veseli, ocrotiţi de cărţi şi de astre deopotrivă.

Zodier  

IANUARIE
La mulţi ani! Ca să începeţi anul râzând, Zodierul vă propune o carte de un umor fantastic, pe teme de ştiinţă, absolut serioase: teoria relativităţii şi mecanica cuantică. Cine poate să împace planuri atât de diferite? Un fizician de geniu, George Gamow, şi simpaticul domn C.G.H. Tompkins, personajul literar pe care l-a creat ca să popularizeze teoriile fizicii. Tompkins este „un mic funcţionar de la o mare bancă“, om cu tabieturi, care citeşte ziarul, iubeşte filmele, dar „detestă obsesia generală – sexul şi violenţa“. Cum ochii îi cad din întâmplare pe o notiţă care anunţă o serie de conferinţe despre problemele fizicii moderne, îşi ia curajul ştiinţific cu amândouă mâinile şi se duce să asculte prelegerea, mai ales că iniţialele numelui său reprezintă trei constante fizice: c, viteza luminii, G, constanta gravitaţională şi h, constanta cuantică. Aşa încep aventurile domnului Tompkins prin lumea fizicii cuantice, univers care i se pare chiar mai ciudat şi mai potrivnic bunului-simţ decât i se va fi părut lui Alice Ţara Minunilor. Găurile negre, biliardul cuantic, demonul lui Maxwell sau tribul vesel al electronilor sunt numai câteva din întâlnirile de care are parte domnul Tompkins în călătoria lui de iniţiere. De care va profita din plin. Să fie Scorpion?
George Gamow, Russell Stannard, Minunata lume a domnului Tompkins. Povestea fantastică a fizicii, trad. de Anca Vişinescu

Armenian Scorpio Sign Coin -2008

Armenian Scorpio Sign Coin -2008

FEBRUARIE
Legendele Graalului preocupă pe toată lumea: de la literaţi la autorii de benzi desenate, de la folclorişti la medievişti, de la ezoterişti la cineaşti. Filme mari, ca A şaptea pecete de Ingmar Bergman, Perceval de Eric Rohmer, Excalibur de John Boorman, Regele pescar de Terry Gilliam sau Magnificat de Pupi Avati şi atâtea altele se inspiră din misterioasa legendă. Zodierul nici nu mai aduce în discuţie romanele recente de tip Dan Brown, al căror succes dovedeşte că interesul marelui public pentru misterul Graalului nu s-a stins. Dacă faceţi parte din acest public sau dacă, aşa cum se spune despre dumneavoastră, aveţi mintea deschisă către orice zonă a cunoaşterii, merită să răsfoiţi cartea lui Evola. Născut la Roma în 1898, Evola frecventează cercurile avangardiste şi e socotit azi unul dintre cei mai de seamă poeţi dadaişti din Italia, apropiat de Tristan Tzara. (Cu atât mai curioasă e, de aceea, ulterioara lui apropiere de extrema dreaptă). Ezoterismul de diverse surse îl preocupă constant. Cartea despre Graal este, ca tot ce a scris Evola, una nonconformistă. Tocmai de aceea cititorul e invitat la început să se dezbare de o serie de prejudecăţi, literare, religioase, folclorice. Nu strică nimănui.
Julius Evola, Misterul Graalului, Studiu introductiv de Franco Cardini, Anexă şi bibliografie de Chiara Nejrotti, trad. de Dragoş Cojocaru

MARTIE
Un mărţişor „cu inimă” pentru noptiera dumneavoastră: cartea despre dragostea favorită a lui Don Juan. Cum să nu fii curios ce tip de dragoste preferă celebrul seducător? Doar că, aşa cum spune Don Juan şi cum simte orice Scorpion îndrăgostit, „În dragoste, totu-i adevărat şi totu-i minciună“. Autorul, asemenea multor scriitori din secolul romantic, este el însuşi un personaj, iar viaţa proprie face concurenţă operei. Dandy care se reneagă, singuratic şi cuceritor, cunoscător al paradisurilor artificiale şi explorator literar al infernurilor, ateu convertit la catolicism fervent, demonizând femeia, dar salvat de „îngerul alb“ – o baroană, atacând celebrităţile literare ale timpului său (Sainte-Beuve, Hugo), fiind contra Academiei, contra lui Flaubert, contra parnasienilor şi contra debutantului Zola, Barbey d’Aurevilly este predestinat să obţină un succes de scandal. Cea mai cunoscută nuvelă a lui din ciclul Diabolicele, care a creat emoţie la apariţie, e Perdeaua stacojie, bijuterie indiscretă la vremea ei, poveste spusă „între bărbaţi“ despre o noapte de dragoste cu final neaşteptat. Impecabilă rămâne şi azi Cea mai frumoasă dragoste a lui Don Juan: la o cină, eroul povesteşte unei duzini de femei curioase (toate foste iubite) care i-a fost cea mai frumoasă dragoste. Veţi citi şi veţi afla.
Barbey D’Aurevilly, Cea mai frumoasă iubire a lui Don Juan, trad. de Mircea Lăzăroniu

APRILIE
Pentru că Paştele cade în miezul lunii aprilie, pe 19 cel ortodox, pe 12 cel catolic şi cel protestant, un comentariu strălucit la Evanghelia după Ioan e, desigur, potrivit. De ce tocmai la Evanghelia după Ioan? Pentru că hermeneuţii o socotesc miezul Bibliei. Deşi „toate cele patru evanghelii ni-l înfăţişează pe Christos”, la Ioan „prezenţa lui este mai intensă decât în celelalte”, povestea are forţă, „un dinamism clar” şi, „pe tot parcursul evangheliei e o înălţare continuă spre ceasul Crucii pascale”. Zodierul, literat, are şi un argument narativ al acestei alegeri. Cel mai puternic început, singurul pe care-l ştie oricine, indiferent de preocupările sau opţiunile spirituale este tocmai al lui Ioan: La început a fost Cuvântul… Comentariul evangheliei îi aparţine Părintelui Scrima, un erudit greu de încadrat în canoanele obişnuite pentru simplul motiv că le depăşeşte, un membru al grupului de la Antim şi un „cetăţean universal” (care a dorit totuşi să moară în România). Având mai multe nivele şi căi de acces, cartea se adresează oricui e dornic de înţelegere. E greu de imaginat cât de pasionantă poate deveni această călătorie la pas, frază cu frază, printr-unul din textele sacre ale omenirii, „cu adevărat o carte a iubirii şi a vieţii”.
André Scrima, Comentariu integral la Evanghelia după Ioan, trad. din arabă de Monica Broşteanu, trad. din franceză de Anca Manolescu

MAI
Deşi zodia Scorpionului este abia a opta a cercului zodiacal, astrele au vrut ca dintre cărţile lunii mai, care sunt cu sau 

Scorpion

Scorpion

despre dragoste, dumneavoastră s-o aveţi în calendar pe cea mai dragă Zodierului. Autorul ei e Octavio Paz, poet şi eseist mexican, laureat în 1990 al Premiului Nobel pentru Literatură. Abia după încă trei ani de la premiu, în 1993, când se apropia de 80 de ani, Paz are curajul să publice o carte dedicată dragostei în sine. O scrie în două luni! Nu este însă o carte de bătrâneţe, şi nici nu e scrisă în atât de puţin timp. Are în ea toate vârstele, pentru că autorul a început-o, virtual, în adolescenţă, atunci când a compus primele poeme de amor. Dragostea trăită o viaţă întreagă, e filtrată din cărţi citite o viaţă întreagă. Meditaţiile pe tema iubirii conţin câtă literatură, atâta viaţă. Iată nişte citate din cele pe care le-a subliniat Zodierul în exemplarul său:
Dragostea e un pariu smintit pe libertate. Nu a mea, a celuilalt.
Quevedo scrie: «Voi fi ţărână, dar ţărână-ndrăgostită».
Dragostea e metafora finală a sexualităţii. Piatra ei de temelie este libertatea: misterul persoanei.
La îndrăgostiţi trupul gândeşte şi sufletul e palpabil.
Persoana iubită e în acelaşi timp terra incognita şi casă părintească.
Dragostea e norocul cel mai mare şi nenorocirea cea mai mare.
Octavio Paz, Dubla flacără. Dragoste şi erotism, trad. de Cornelia Rădulescu

IUNIE
După dubla flacără din luna mai şi înainte de zăpuşeala care începe la solstiţiu, un duş rece e binevenit. Citiţi aşadar Ghidul nesimţitului de Radu Paraschivescu, cea mai bună metodă de a te răcori prin râs. Dintre vietăţile zodiacului pe care le cunoaşte direct Zodierul, cele mai politicoase şi mai bine crescute sunt Scorpionii, aşa că nu se vor simţi cu musca pe căciulă atnci când autorul descrie fiziologia nesimţitului de oraş. Cu toate variantele lui: nesimţitul de bloc, care-şi cumpără boxele cele mai puternice şi le testează la 3 dimineaţa, nesimţitul de la volan şi cel din autobuz, cel de pe trotuar, de la teatru sau din biserică. Când îi vezi pe stradă, te îmbolnăveşti, când îi vezi în carte te vindeci prin râs. Autorul e un Leu aşezat şi – Zodierul depune mărturie – opus personajelor din ghid. Iată-i prezentarea dintr-o carte de pe noptiera Gemenilor: „Abstinent, dar cafegiu. Ironic, dar sentimental. Harnic, dar jucăuş. O aprigă mustaţă îi maschează bine tandreţea. Se teme de avioane chiar şi când îi fac daruri. Prezidează peste trei motani mizantropi şi-i înţelege din ce în ce mai bine”. Citiţi ghidul ca vedeţi de unde i se trage mizantropia. În prezentare găsiţi şi o vorbă a lui Mark Twain: „Omul e singurul animal care roşeşte. Sau ar trebui s-o facă”.
Radu Paraschivescu, Ghidul nesimţitului, Colecţia „Râsul lumii

IULIE
Peştele-scorpion, nici nu se putea titlu mai potrivit dumneavoastră. Dar cartea nu e aleasă totuşi pentru nume, ci pentru frumuseţea ei ieşită din comun. Ar putea fi jurnal de călătorie, dacă n-ar fi în ea decât exotismul unor locuri îndepărtate, ca India şi Insula Ceylon. Nicolas Bouvier, un francez care a umblat hai-hui în lume de la 17 ani, bolnav de depărtare, depăşeşte însă cu mult limitele genului diaristic şi alunecă bine în roman. Tânărul ajuns singur în Orient e un fel de Robinson care-şi ia în stăpânire insula, cu o bucurie şi o dăruire pe care nici strămoşul literar nu le-a avut. Sentimente sunt din plin, dar niciodată sentimentalism, niciodată kitsch al inimii. Şi, pentru că Bouvier e singuratic doar de nevoie, se împrieteneşte cu tot ce mişcă în jur. Cu oamenii e mai prudent (nişte mici derbedei îl strigă Mister-what’s-your-name, iar un hangiu îi spune Ba-o-u-vi-e-eerr Sahib deoarece, ca să intri în rândul lumii e nevoie de un nume de cel puţin 12 silabe), în schimb e plin de atenţie cu „menajeria” personală, furnici, gândaci şi scorpioni, un crab şi un splendid peşte-scorpion în borcan: „Viaţa insectelor seamănă cu a noastră măcar sub un aspect: nici nu ai apucat să faci cunoştinţă, că deja există un învingător şi un învins”. Bouvier e învingător: scapă de demonii din el însuşi.
Nicolas Bouvier, Peştele-scorpion, trad. de Emanoil Marcu, Colecţia „Memorii. Jurnale”

AUGUST
Pentru că iubesc nisipul fierbinte, Scorpionii îşi duc cărţile de vacanţă spre mare. Şi nu cărţi grele, ca unii colegi de zodiac mai snobi, ci cărţi numite uşoare. Paradoxul observat de mult timp de Zodier este că, cu cât e mai uşoară o carte, cu atât se scrie mai greu. De aceea autorii buni de romane poliţiste sau de cărţi pentru copii sunt foarte rari. Argentinianul Guillermo Martínez, un matematician care a stat la Oxford cu o bursă postdoctorală, face parte dintre ei: a scris un policier bun. Decorul e chiar micul orăşel universitar Oxford. Naratorul, un tânăr matematician (specialist în topologie algebrică) abia sosit, e implicat, fără voia lui, în rezolvarea unor crime numite seria Oxford. Cuvântul „serie” nu duce cu gândul numai la criminalul în serie, ci şi la matematică. Într-adevăr, se pare că există o legătură între seriile de crime şi o carte despre seriile logice publicat de un profesor faimos, Arthur Seldom. Cei doi universitari, unul pe post de Sherlock Holmes, iar celălalt gata să înveţe, ca Watson, se dedică rezolvării cazului. Un strop de dragoste pe post de condiment. Zodierul ar fi criminal dacă ar spune mai mult.
Guillermo Martínez, Crimele din Oxford, trad. de Ileana Scipione, Colecţia „Raftul Denisei”

SEPTEMBRIE
Dacă pe soţia lui Carol I, Elisabeta, mai cunoscută cu numele de poetă, Carmen Sylva, fotografiile ne-o prezintă în ipostaze lirice, la pian sau la masa de scris, cu un aer parcă desprins de lume, Regina Maria, soţia lui Ferdinand, s-a impus în istorie tocmai prin energia, realismul şi vioiciunea ei. Născută la 29 octombrie 1875 (în zodia dumneavoastră), nepoată a Reginei Victoria, care o alinta cu numele de Missy, Maria vine la 17 ani în România (despre care abia dacă ştia unde se află pe hartă pentru că nu dovedise niciodată „o înclinaţie deosebită pentru geografie”). Pe an ce trece, se leagă tot mai mult de noua ei ţară, iar personalitatea şi frumuseţea ei devin legendare. În Marele Război îşi pune viaţa în primejdie îngrijind bolnavii şi, în scurt timp, e adorată de toată armata. Un martor ocular francez o vede la defilarea din 28 august 1916, după ce Consiliul Coroanei ia hotărârea ca România să intre în război de partea Aliaţilor şi e cucerit de „privirea luminoasă a ochilor ei uimitor de limpezi, […] de un mov care este exact movul florilor pe care le-a preferat toată viaţa, violetele de Parma”. Istoricul şi magistratul francez Guy Gauthier scrie o carte captivantă. Un mic reproş al Zodierului: fiind francez, are chiar mai puţină înţelegere pentru Carol I decât va fi avut eroina lui.
Guy Gauthier, Missy, Regina României, trad. de Andreea Popescu, Seria „Casa regală”

OCTOMBRIE
În cartea lunii trecute aţi avut ocazia să recapitulaţi, cu ochii unui francez, istoria primei jumătăţi a secolului 20. Acum istoria sfârşitului de secol 19 şi o altă faţă a lui Nicolae Iorga decât cea „tradiţională”: tânărul furios. Este ciudat cât de mult seamănă tonul şi revoltele junelui Iorga (nu împlinise încă 30 de ani) cu tonul de mai târziu al tinerilor interbelici, inclusiv al celor care îl vor ataca, între care şi fostul admirator Eliade. Revoltele lui sunt justificate  şi nicidecum singulare în epocă: lucrurile scârţâie, Academia şi Universitatea sunt departe de a funcţiona perfect, gazetarii sunt superficiali şi au lauda uşoară. V.A. Urechia este un impstor, dar nici de B.P. Hasdeu nu e mulţumit Iorga şi-i doboară pe amândoi dintr-o lovitură, pe aceeaşi pagină. (Înţepătura nu era tocmai elegantă: Hasdeu fusese primul care-l ironizase – şi mult mai fin – pe Urechia, iar ca erudiţie şi acribie se afla la polul opus). Pe Ionnescu-Gion îl face literalmente praf, cu floreta antifrazei, iar pe Grigore Tocilescu îl acuză de plagiat. Textele sunt puternice, au viaţă, merită citite. Zodierul s-a întrebat doar cu ce ochi ar privi tânărul Iorga ce se întâmplă în zilele noastre şi cum ieşim din comparaţia cu relele timpului său.
Nicolae Iorga, Opinii sincere şi pernicioase ale unui rău patriot, trad., introducere şi note de Andrei Pippidi

Scorpio

Scorpio

NOIEMBRIE
„Aţi muri dacă vi s-ar interzice să scrieţi?“ Întrebarea îi aparţine lui Rilke şi este reluată de Claude Bonnefoy în convorbirile cu Eugène Ionesco. Interlocutorul răspunde: „Nu, nu, desigur. Însă mi-ar părea grozav de rău…“  Pentru dumneavoastră, Zodierul schimbă întrebarea: aţi muri dacă vi s-ar interzice să citiţi? Un lucru e limpede: dacă n-aţi citi convorbirile lui Eugène Ionescocu Claude Bonnefoy, aţi pierde o bucurie. Bonnefoy este plin de bună-credinţă, după cum îl arată şi numele (bonne foi), iar Ionesco este …ionescian. Adică tragic, mirat, seducător, inocent. Fără trucaje. Cartea conţine un mănunchi de chei pe care le puteţi potrivi în piesele de teatru ale lui Ionesco. Ce este teatrul? „Poate că asta este teatrul: revelaţia unui lucru care era ascuns. Teatrul este neaşteptatul care se arată.” În romanul său Însinguratul se pleacă de la câteva din semnele de întrebare aflate la temelia creaţiei şi a vieţii lui Ionescu-Ionesco, a dramei lui identitare: „Ce fac eu aici? De ce sunt aici? Ce este lumea din jurul meu?“ Nu rareori dramaturgul merge împotriva curentului, cu formulări-surpriză: „Însăşi demistificarea e o adevărată mistificare”. Joc, dar cu miză maximă.
P.S. Eugen Ionescu e Scorpion, iar anul acesta, pe 13 noiembrie, se împlinesc 100 de ani de la naşterea lui.
Eugène Ionesco, Între viaţă şi vis. Convorbiri cu Claude Bonnefoy, trad. de Simona Cioculescu

DECEMBRIE
O carte despre îngeri este cum nu se poate mai potrivită pentru decembrie, iar dacă e scrisă de Andrei Pleşu cadoul de Crăciun e gata. Este dintre produsele care nu expiră la scurt timp după apariţie, e vie, îngerii din ea sunt vii şi zboară printre rânduri. Are şi o solidă reţea bibliografică, pusă doar ca o plasă de protecţie pentru periculoasa echilibristică din susul paginii. Căci tot ce ţine de o realitate impalpabilă de un posibil „dublu” ceresc al omului, implică, la fiecare frază, o primejdie. Portretul îngerului, aşa cum se încheagă de la o pagină la alta, depăşeşte, desigur, imaginea lui plastică (şi e opusul îngeraşilor care invadează vitrinele în aceste zile) şi e nevoie mai degrabă de o imaginaţie ştiinţifică pentru a-l “vedea”. De aceea în tradiţia textelor despre îngeri se face adesea analogie cu lumina şi cu spaţiul oglinzii, cu imaginile inversate din oglindă (cine e în oglindă ? ce realitate are chipul meu în ea? de ce nu-mi pot atinge realitatea din oglindă ?). Totul ţine de o lume care “e tot atât de reală şi de ireală pe cât este lumea vizibilă pentru un orbi”.  Cartea îţi deschide ochii, şi nu neapărat ca să vezi îngeri. Ca să vezi mai bine lumea asta cu oamenii ei. Fie-vă îngerii aproape!
La mulţi ani!
Andrei Pleşu, Despre îngeri

(Text preluat de pe http://www.erudio.ro)

12/05/2011

Sa radem…

Filed under: FRUMOS,PENTRU MINTE — afractalus @ 08:12
Tags: , , , ,

Am de cateva luni, pe stick, o imagine luata din Linn Stamp News, cu gandul de a o posta aici. Am lasat loc altor articole mai serioase (mi-am spus eu !) si am tot amanat postarea ei, desi are un umor de cea mai buna calitate Azi i-a venit randul:

Linn Stamp 2010, 01-18

Linn Stamp 2010, 01-18

PS. Cred ca aniversarea a 100 de postari se poate face cu umor !!!

07/01/2011

“Concertul” – Radu Mihaileanu şi Piotr Ilici Ceaikovski (II)


Ceaikovski

Ceaikovski

Motto:

“What I need is to believe in myself again— for my faith has been greatly undermined; it seems to me my role is over.”

– Letter to a nephew (9 February 1893) Just prior to composing his „Pathetique” Symphony (No. 6)

Aşa cum “Le Concert” pe lângă coloana sonoră magnifică (premiu Cesar !) are în spate şi o poveste bine articulată, Concertul pentru vioară Op.35 a lui Ceaikovski are, la rândul său, o poveste foarte interesantă. Pe măsura filmului. Şi poate că această întâlnire între film şi muzică (cu poveştile din spatele lor) nu este întâmplătoare. De obicei lucrurile frumoase merg împreună !

În primul rând să ne uităm la “fişa tehnică” :

Catalogue References: TH 59 ; ČW 54

Date:  March 1878

Key:    Re major

Tempo/Section Listing

1. Allegro moderato—Moderato assai (D major, 339 bars)

2. Canzonetta. Andante (G minor, 119 bars)

3. Finale. Allegro vivacissimo (D major, 639 bars)

Instrumentation:  Violin solo + 2 Flutes, 2 Oboes, 2 Clarinets (A), 2 Bassoons + 4 Horns (F), 2 Trumpets (D) + Timpani + Violins I, Violins II, Violas, Cellos, Double Basses

Arrangements Also arranged for Violin with Piano by Tchaikovsky, March 1878

First Performance:       Vienna, 22 November/4 December 1881, by Adolph Brodsky, conducted by Hans Richter

Autograph Location:   Moscow (Russia): Glinka State Central Museum of Musical Culture (ф. 88, No. 95) — full score

First Publication: Moscow: P. Jurgenson, 1878 (arrangement for violin with piano), 1888 (full score)

Average Duration : 34 minutes

Dedication: Adolph Brodsky (1851–1929) (originally Leopold Auer, 1845–1930)

Ceaikovski trece printr-o grea perioadă a vieţii. Mariajul dezastruos cu Antonina Miliukova îi provoacă o gravă depresie. Pleacă să se refacă în Clarens – o mică staţiune elveţiană pe malul lacului Geneva – însoţit imediat după de elevul, prietenul şi, se pare (există destule referinţe în acest sens !) iubitul său Iosif Kotek. Ceaikovski cântă la pian iar Kotek la vioară.

Ceaikovski impreuna cu Kotek

Ceaikovski impreuna cu Kotek

Imediat după sosirea lui Kotek, în timp ce interpretau variatiuni după Simfonia Spaniolă a lui Lalo, Ceaikovski se simte cuprins brusc de inspiraţie. Era 17 martie 1878. În aceeaşi zi îi scrie viitoarei protectoare Nadejda Von Meck : „This evening I was seized … quite unexpectedly with a burning inspiration…”. Lasă deopate sonata pentru pian la care lucra şi, pentru prima dată în viaţă începe Concertul pentru vioară.

Se spune că inspiraţia a plecat de la lucrarea lui Lalo, Simfonia spaniolă, la care Ceaikovski a remarcat atentia pentru prospeţime în detrimentul profunzimii, ritmurile noi cu accent mai degrabă pe muzicalitate decât pe păstrarea tradiţiei. Deşi lucrarea aduce forme noi în muzică şi interpretare, ideile îi vin cu repeziciune astfel încât în cinci zile termină prima mişcare (Allegro moderato—Moderato assai (D major, 339 bars)). Pe 23 martie începe a doua mişcare (Andante) pe care o termină pe 26 martie, iar pe 28 martie scrie că “a reuşit să termine concertul”.

Pentru că Ceaikovski nu era violonist îi cere părerea lui Kotek pentru părţile solo. Rescrie partea a doua pe 24 martie şi rearanjează partea pentru pian din Allegro. Începe imediat să finiseze lucrarea iar pe 11 aprilie partitura este complet gata. Această minunăţie a fost scrisă în mai puţin de o lună !

Iniţial vrea să o dedice lui Iosif Kotek, dar acest lucru ar fi alimentat zvonurile cu privire la relaţia lor. Mai mult, Kotek nu o consideră o piesă deosebită şi refuză interpretarea considerând că îi poate afecta cariera. Acest lucru duce şi la sfârşitul relaţiei lor. Apoi Ceaikovski se decide s-o dedice lui Leopold Auer, cel care urma s-o interpreteze pentru prima dată.

Prima reprezentaţie a fost stabilită pentru 22 martie 1879 (la un an după ce a fost scrisă) la Sankt Petersburg, dar Auer declară că piesa este dificil de interpretat şi se renunţă la concert. În acest fel piesa capătă reputaţia de neinterpretabilă şi nimeni nu doreşte s-o interpreteze. Totuşi prima reprezentaţie are loc la New York în 1879 de către Leopold Damrosch. În Europa, primul interpret al concertului este Adolf Brodski în data de 8 decembrie 1881 la Filarmonica din Viena. Succesul a fost foarte mare, în ciuda unor reţineri din partea criticilor.

În urma interpretării de la Viena, Brodski primeşte mai multe oferte de a concerta, printre care şi la Londra la „Richter Concert” în 8 mai 1882. Este interpretarea care va consacra Concertul pentru vioară op.35 ca una din cele mai frumoase piese pentru vioară. Interpretarea lui Brodski este atât de frumoasă încât Ceaikovski hotărăşte să schimbe in favoarea lui, definitiv, dedicaţia piesei.

04/01/2011

“Concertul” – Radu Mihaileanu şi Piotr Ilici Ceaikovski (I)


Motto:

“I sit down to the piano regularly at nine-o’clock in the morning and Mesdames les Muses have learned to be on time for that rendezvous.”

“Inspiration is a guest that does not willingly visit the lazy.”

” The creative process is like music which takes root with extraordinary force and rapidity.”

(Ceaikovski)

“I discovered that Tchaikovsky’s concerto couldn’t be harmonious if the violin and orchestra did not complement each other . . . Today’s crisis shows this in a violent way; the link between the individual and the collective must be very strong and in order to find harmony – or happiness – we must try to play in unison as much as we can.”

(Radu Mihăileanu – From the film’s production notes)

Le Concert

Le Concert

L-am văzut prima dată la sfârşitul anului trecut pe HBO. Fantastic, genial, dumnezeiesc… L-am revăzut acum la început de an redifuzat de acelaşi HBO. Aceeaşi emoţie, lacrimi şi încă ceva: aceeaşi dorinţă întâlnită acum mulţi ani după ce am văzut “Amadeus” de a asculta tot ce a compus compozitorul. În cazul lui Mozart a fost dragoste la prima vedere… adică la prima ascultare! De atunci ascult cu plăcere orice piesă de Mozart. La Ceaikovski nu ştiu ce să spun, parcă e prea contemporan (mă rog…), parcă se simte un pic din componistica modernă, pe care eu nu prea o înţeleg.

Acum cinci ani am văzut „Trenul vieţii”(Train de vie) făcut de Radu Mihăileanu în 1998. O comedie excelentă, amară pe alocuri, dar câtâ subtilitate… câtâ cunoaştere a psihologiei umane… !!!

Le ConcertFaptul că el este născut în România (23 aprilie 1958), că foloseşte actori români, că a fost filmat mai mult de jumătate în România şi că are legătură cu vecinii noştri de la est, face ca filmul să aibă un aer românesc. Aici se adaugă obiceiuri estice (româneşti!) care accentuează senzaţia: lipsa punctualităţii, lucruri făcute “merge şi aşa”, statul la coadă, impovizaţia ca soluţie ultimă de ieşire din criză, etc. A fost nominalizat la Globul de Aur (păcat că l-a ratat) dat a luat două premii César, pentru sunet, respectiv pentru cea mai bună coloană sonoră. În plus, filmul „Concertul” a primit patru trofee Gopo, pentru cel mai bun montaj, cea mai bună muzică originală, cea mai bună scenografie şi cel mai bun machiaj şi coafură. Deci a a vut o recunoaştere rezonabilă în lumea filmului, deşi, între noi fie vorba, pelicula este mult peste “colegele” nominalizate la aceeaşi secţiune.

Multe secvenţe mi-au rămas în minte dar cea de la sfârşitul filmului este deosebită: concertul începe ezitant, doi instrumentişti întârziaţi işi ocupă în ultimul moment locurile, câţiva spectatori râd, directorul teatrului este în pragul crizei iar în culise “organizatorul” ad-hoc al gruplui îi cere lui Dumnezeu să facă o minune. După primele acorduri ale orchestrei toată lumea din sală (inclusiv cel care urmăreşte filmul !) are impresia unui concert-dezastru, parcă fiecare interpretează propria partitură iar printr-o rapidă schimbare de planuri regizorul intensifică această senzaţie. Dar chiar atunci când, uitându-te la film, crezi că nu mai e nimic de făcut, că îţi pare foarte rău de eşecul lui Andrei (!) Filipov ca dirijor începe vioara. Timid  în primele secunde, dar pe măsură ce vioara “se aude” ai senzaţia că ea “a hotărât” să transforme dezastrul în triumf şi transmite din priviri dirijorului şi orchestrei, că va fi acea interpretare unică de care îi vorbise Andrei  cu o zi înainte de concert.

Aici se simte accentuat arta regizorului. Privirile dintre violonista Anne-Marie Jacquet (Mélanie Laurent) şi dirijorul Andrey Simonovich Filipov – Il Maestro (Aleksey Guskov) sunt parcă cele dintre doi îndrăgostiţi, magice. Această magie se transmite orchestrei, publicului, spectatorului (cu siguranţă!) culminând, la sfârşitul concertului, cu îmbrăţişarea dintre Andrei şi Anne-Marie. Iată “Concertul Perfect” !

Coloana sonoră este deosebită iar Concertul lui Ceaikovski pentru vioară op.35 este divin. Poate dacă îl ascultam la un post de radio nu-i dădeam atâta atenţie, dar ”îmbrăcat” într-o astfel de poveste îmi va rămâne mereu în memorie. După “Amadeus” am căutat cu înfrigurare Recviem-ul lui Mozart; după “Concertul” am fugit pe net la povestea acestei piese….

08/11/2010

Octavian Paler – Cazul Rembrandt (I). Seară la Veneţia.


Rembrandt

Ce surpriză am avea punând într-o singură sală de muzeu toate autoportretele lui Rembrandt !

Şi poate că această sală ar trebui să fie nu la Amsterdam, ci într-un oraş unde Rembrandt, advesar al călătoriilor, n-a fost niciodată: la Veneţia. Să se audă afară clopotul de la San Marco şi apele lagunei lovindu-se de cheiurile de piatră în acelaşi timp cu silabele de bronz ale orologiului din turn. Să ieşim din rutina vanităţilor derizorii, învăţând din melancolia Veneţiei ceea ce trebuiau să ne înveţe propriile noastre greşeli.

Şi în acest timp, trecând prin faţa autoportretelor lui Rembrandt, ele să ne spună o dublă poveste. Pe de o parte povestea unui trup care se îndepărtează mereu de gloria ingenuă a tinereţii şi pe de altă parte cea a unei vieţi interioare care se apropie tot mai mult de gloria amară a înţelepciunii. Aceste două poveşti sunt ca două râuri care curg în sens contrar. Unul din ce în ce mai obosit, altul din ce în ce mai profund. Pe măsură ce trupul îşi pierde vigoarea şi îmbătrâneşte, ochii lui Rembrandt ne fascinează mai mult. Toată înverşunarea unui trup care se macină sporindu-şi flacăra e în ei.

Să mărturisim, măcar în tăcere, că am tresărit. Acest vrăjitor nu-şi spune numai propria sa poveste. Ora cea mai aproape de el este cea în care se îngână ziua cu noaptea. Şi unde se îngână ziua cu noaptea mai prelung decât la Veneţia ? Atunci, oraşul dogilor ne arată, poate mai bine decât oricare altul, ce rămâne după ce zarva încetează. Din tot ce i-a hrănit odinioară gloria şi ambiţiile, a rămas o măreţie mâhnită în care filosofii olandezului s-ar simţi la locul lor.

Căci înţelepciunea se naşte aproape totdeauna din regrete. Şi din acelaşi motiv trebuie, poate, să fi trăit noi înşine anumite lucruri ca să înţelegem cât de cât istoria unui om. Mă întreb ce-aş fi gândit în tinereţe într-un asemenea muzeu cum e cel pe care mi-l închipui acum. Aş fi trecut, probabil, mai grăbit prin dreptul acelor autoportrete în care Rembrandt ştie că un bătrân e totdeauna un rege Lear, cum ar zice Goethe, şi aş fi zâmbit pictorului de douăzeci şi nouă de ani care râde, îmbătat de succes mai mult decât vinul de Rhin din cupa pe care o ridică în sănătatea noastră. Probabil, atunci nu mi-ar fi trecut prin minte că, într-un fel sau altul, avem propria noastră luptă cu îngerul.

În schimb, acum ştiu de ce mă simt tentat să-l caut pe Rembrandt mai întâi într-un oraş care a experimentat şi iluzia şi dezamăgirea, deci înţelege de ce umbra sfârşeşte prin a se transforma în oglindă. La Amsterdam, corăbiile vin şi pleacă, pe cheiuri e o forfotă continuă. Cine are vreme de viaţa interioară când în aer plutesc ispite mai mari ? Şi cine are chef să ia în seamă faptul că Rembrandt n-a cunoscut decât două oraşe, când sirenele vapoarelor strigă altă credinţă ?

E adevărat, el a refuzat oferta de a merge în Italia, cum cerea moda pentru pictori, motivănd că şi-ar pierde un timp reţios călătorind, iar ipoteza unui drum în Anglia n-a fost niciodată dovedită. Biografii săi pretind că n-a părăsit Amsterdamul, după ce s-a stabilit acolo, decât de două ori: o dată pentru a merge cu Saskia să se căsătorească şi a doua oară când a făcut o plimbare la Utrecht. Ceea ce sună destul de ciudat într-un secol ca al nostru, care a făcut din călătorie un mit. Şi dacă adăugăm că într-un inventar al bunurilor lui Rembrandt, făcut când tot avutul său a fost scos la licitaţie de creditori, sunt trecute între atâtea colecţii preţioase numai douăzeci de cărţi, globetrotterii vor prinde şi mai mult curaj să pună la îndoială că fiul morarului din Leyda a fost un înţelept.

Dar nu e nevoie să transformăm inapetenţa lui Rembrandt pentru voiaje într-un criteriu şi într-un model. Să observăm mai bine că acest om care n-a părăsit Amsterdamul a văzut mai mult decât cei care au vânturat pământul şi că acest pictor ai cărui filosofi citesc mereu aceeaşi carte a înţeles parcă mai mult decât toţi erudiţii. Lui îi ajunge un obraz pentru a ne spune tot ce scrie în cărţi şi tot ce alţii n-au văzut cutreierând lumea.

De ce ne-am mira atunci că romantismul care a făcut din Venetia oraşul său sacru îl venerează pe Rembrandt ? Bătrânii pictorului din amsterdam ar fi surâs dacă le-ar fi amintit cineva că Alexandru cel Mare vroia să cucerească lumea prin sabie. Ei ştiu povestea până la capăt. De aceea uneori nu mai au nici nume, nici vârstă. Ca umbrele Veneţiei unde orologiul din piaţa San Marco nu spune, anunţând miezul zilei, “e ora 12”, ci “iată cum trece timpul”. Aproape nimeni dintre cei care vizitează Veneţia nu ascultă, cred, bătăile acestui orologiu pentru a verifica ora exactă. Pentru asta ne ajung ceasurile obişnuite. Asemenea artei, sunetele de bronz din cetatea dogilor ne tulbură, nu ne informează.

Seara, Veneţia îmbătrâneşte brusc. O vedem împovărată de propria ei istorie, prin care trecem pedepsiţi pentru nepăsarea noastră zgomotoasă, întreruptă o clipă şi reluată apoi. Dar ceva din avertismentul silabisit mai devreme pluteşte mai depate în aer. Într-o asemenea seară am visat cum se organizează un muzeu la Venetia, special pentru autoportretele lui Rembrandt, şi cum se perindă prin el cei care n-au răbdare să admire altfel decât inutil, după cotele de celebritate. O asemenea seară ne-ar putea fi în multe privinţe de folos. Din păcate, cele peste şaisezi de autoportrete ale lui rembrandt sunt risipite In lume, iar la Veneţia nimeni nu ia lecţii de umilinţă. Abia avem timp pentru aroganţă şi pentru pustiu. Deşi mai e totdeauna o speranţă în serile obişnuite.

Publicat in „Flacara” nr. 1274 – 08.11.1979

01/11/2010

Charles W. Colson – Nascut din nou (Fragment)


Extraordinara carte de marturie. Am citit-o minunandu-ma de fiecare pagina. La un moemnt dat am gasit acest fragment deosebit:

[p.213-214]  Pe măsură ce vorbea, Nixon era aproape gata să-şi mărturisească credinţa, vorbind mai deschis ca oricând în lunga sa carieră politică.
“ Când aveam opt sau nouă ani, am întrebat-o pe bunica mea, o femeie foarte evlavioasă, o micuţă doamnă quaker cu nouă copii, am întrebat-o de ce cred quaqerii în rugăciunea tăcută. De câte ori ne aşezam la masă ne rugam în tăcere, iar la biserică, deşi uneori pastorul sau altcineva se ridica în picioare când se simţea mişcat de Duhul , de cele mai multe ori mergeam, luam loc şi ne rugam.
Răspunsul ei a foat foarte interesant şi e probabil legat de motivul pentru care Lincoln se ruga în tăcere. Bunica mea mi-a răspuns aşa cum făcea întotdeauna când vorbea cu copiii sau nepoţii ei, cu cuvinte simple: ‘’Ceea ce trebuie să înţelegi, Richard, este că scopul rugăciunii e să-L auzi pe Dumnezeu, nu să-I vorbeşti lui Dumnezeu. Scopul rugăciunii nu este să-I spui lui Dumnezeu ce vrei, ci să afli ce vrea El de la tine.’’ “.

28/06/2010

Zodia Rac (II)

Filed under: FRAGMENTE DIN CARTI SI BLOGURI,FRUMOS,PENTRU MINTE — afractalus @ 10:37
Tags: , , ,

Temperament si Caracter Zodia Racului

Zodiac RacDescriere: Acest semn simbolizeaza perioada în care apar fructele, maturizare germenului fecundat într-un elan vital de nestapanit. Asociem imaginea “racului”, profilul sau existential cu tot ceea ce înseamna vatra, mama, familie, popor, tara.

Metafora cea mai reprezentativa pentru el este cea a apelor adanci, denotand profunzimea (discreta) a nativilor. Sunt foarte sensibili si extrem de emotivi, sentimentali, usor impresionabili.

Luna are o mare influenta asupra lor si diferitele ei faze le determina stari sufletesti schimbatoare. În aspectele lor cele mai putin laudabile pot fi irascibili, excentrici si agitati.

Nu e întotdeauna foarte usor sa întelegi un “rac”, dimpotriva. Chiar atunci cand pare foarte sociabil si transparent, veti constata ca descoperirea mobilelor actiunilor sale e adesea o veritabila problema de enigmistica.

În variantele cele mai des întalnite, îl veti gasi putin rezervat si misterios, timid chiar (dar iradiind, în general, un farmec aparte, un anume magnetism dublat de caldura si delicatete sufleteasca).

O constanta a sa este aceea de a exagera anumite laturi ale unor probleme pana ce acestea se transforma în obstacole de netrecut – si atunci va depune mari eforturi pentru a le depasi.

Aspecte nesemnificative pentru altii în cazul lui o rezonanta deosebita, proces ce tine de firea sa foarte impresionabila. E lesne de dedus de aici o alta trasatura definitorie, anume scrupulozitatea de care da dovada în actiunile care-l privesc direct, excesiva uneori.

Nu are obiceiul de a se încrede prea usor în altii si, desi aparenta sa linistita va poate însela, e bine sa fiti de la bun început constient ca el îsi cunoaste foarte bine interesul si stie foarte bine cum sa si-l urmareasca; uneori poate fi chiar foarte egoist.

Ceea cel face de temut este consecventa pe care o reliefeaza în tot ce face si care se poate lesne transforma în încapatanare. El va sfarsi în cele din urma prin a-si atinge scopul si nimeni nu va putea sa spuna vreodata ca nu e meritul lui. Idealul sau este în general o situatie materiala solida si va face totul ca sa o obtina.

Foarte conservator, traditionalist, tot ceea ce înseamna întamplare îl irita pentru ca îi afecteaza sentimentul de stabilitate si de securitate personala care pentru el conteaza enorm. A nu se întelege de aici ca devine obtuz în fata noului, a progresului în sensurile sale cele mai largi.

Va prefera însa mereu ceea ce apartine trecutului, traind adesea în epoci revolute, impregnate de un parfum nostalgic. Îi place sa colectioneze diferite lucruri, de preferinta antichitati ale istoriei omenirii, ori ale celei personale.

Este omul care se leaga afectiv de toate vestigiile trecutului sau, îndeosebi de cele ale copilariei sale si, daca vreti sa-l enervati la culme, ironizati-l în aceasta privinta, ori aruncati-i la gunoi vreunul din pretioasele sale obiecte din vremuri defuncte.

Îi place foarte mult sa aiba un camin bine închegat, cu o usoara tenta patriarhala (ori matriarhala) si cu multi copii; un refugiu intim, sigur si cald în care sa se poata retrage atunci cand simte nevoia. Tine mult la membrii familiei si va face totul pentru a le asigura conditii de viata dintre cele mai bune.

Pe oriunde trece un “rac” (fie chiar si printr-un hotel), dupa un oarecare interval de timp acel loc/camera va dobandi un aspect familiar, intim, cald.

Îl poti recunoaste oriunde dupa acest talent al sau, privind doar spatiul închis în care s-a aranjat si daca e adevarat ca o camera locuita poate spune o adevarata poveste despre un om, atunci cu siguranta ca acesta este cazul lui, iar povestea va fi probabil frumoasa.

Se cufunda adesea în profunde reverii si viseaza cu ochii deschisi la lucruri trecute ori viitoare; aceasta trasatura e uneori asociata cu tendinta de a se retrage din lume, într-un fel de pustnicie avand uneori unele valente mistice (a se vedea în acest sens cazul unui celebru “rac” – Constantin Noica si “scoala de la Paltinis”).

Are un gust foarte dezvoltat pentru calatorii, caci este o fire curioasa care simte în permanenta nevoia de a vedea si de a se instrui si este impulsionat de dorinta de schimbare ce-i contrabalanseaza latura conservatoare.

Este superstios, generos, altruist; este un foarte bun sfatuitor, sugestiile oferite fiind fondate pe prudenta si pe un ascutit sint de observatie.

Este, de asemenea, un excelent consolator si îngrijitor în situatii mai dureroase, din punct de vedere fizic si sentimental. Bun povestitor, poseda o memorie de exeptie, are multa intuitie, romantism si imaginatie.

Exista cateva lucruri pe care nu le suporta si pe care cei care vor sa se afle în bune relatii cu el nu trebuie sa le faca niciodata: critica de orice fel – pe care o resimte foarte profund si jignitor, presiuni sentimentale sau de alta natura, contrarieri si – atentie! – e foarte susceptibil în ceea ce priveste eventuale afirmatii deplasate despre mama sa.

Zodiac RacBoli: Desi unii nativi au tendinte spre ipohondrie, suporta în general cu mult curaj durerea fizica. Afectiunile cele mai frecvente limfatic si aparatul digestiv. Avand un fond emotiv foarte puternic, se pot usor îmbolnavi de ulcer, pe baza nervoasa. Posibile tulburari nervoase, în aceeasi ordine de idei.

Zodiac RacPersonalitati: W.G. Leibniz, Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Marcel Proust, Ernest Hemingway, Franz Kafka, Vasile Alecsandri, N. Balcescu, Fr. Schubert, Rembrandt, Vittorio de Sica, Gina Lollobrigida, Harrison Ford, Sylvester Stallone, Louis Armstrong, George Harrison, Di Stefano, Mario Kampes, Michel Platini.

Simbolul Racului

Glifa:

Glifa RacSugerand clestii unui crab, ideograma semnului, simbolizeaza uniunea cercului spiritual cu semiluna sufletului, a spermei masculine cu ovulul feminin (fertilitatea), intr-un act de a da si a lua printr-un gest de protectie. Semnul este sensibil, emotiv, intelegator si compatimitor, fara linii drepte. Racul este semnul debutului de vara. Este anotimpul florilor. Seva urca in vegetatie. In tema natala, semnul Racului arata radacinile individului, bazele sale, ereditatea si locul unde el se simte ca acasa, domiciliul sau. Este semnul fecunditatii si al cresterii. Esoteric, Racul reprezinta poarta de intrare a sufletului in lumea manifestata.

11/04/2010

Despre adevar – Silvia Velea


Câti dintre noi n-am trait la un moment dat, într-o relatie sau în mai multe relatii, impresia ca nu suntem întelesi? Câti dintre noi nu ne-am privit partenerul de dragoste, de viata sau pur si simplu interlocutorul cu sentimentul, reciproc adeseori, ca unul vede si celalalt e orb? Si astfel, încercând sa ne facem întelesi pentru celalalt, am devenit confuzi pentru noi însine.

N-am mai spus ce aveam de spus, pe drumul drept si clar al simtirii de sine, ci ne-am angajat sa strabatem toate meandrele si hatisurile celuilalt, pierzând în fiecare clipa în maracinii personalitatii lui câte putin din mesajul nostru si din noi însine, ca sa ne trezim prinsi, în cele din urma, într-o capcana a comunicarii.

Un raspuns pe care-l dai trebuie sa exprime ceea ce întelegi tu, ceea ce crezi tu, nu ceea ce poate sa înteleaga sau sa creada altcineva. Un raspuns pe care-l dai trebuie sa fie o lamurire de sine, pentru sine, nu pentru altcineva. Bineînteles ca e mai usor sa nu spunem adevarul când consideram ca celalalt nu este pregatit sa-l primeasca ca atare si sa-l pretuiasca. Sa nu spunem adevarul celor care sunt convinsi ca îl cunosc deja. Sa nu spunem adevarul celor care-si fac iluzii si nu vor sa le fie spulberate. Sa nu spunem adevarul daca interpretarea sa poate crea false asteptari. Sa nu spunem adevarul ca sa ranim sau sa pedepsim.

Adevarul ar trebui sa fie o dovada de încredere, sa fie cel mai frumos dar pe care oamenii si-l pot face. Un dar din iubire, pentru iubire. Nu o sabie cu doua taisuri. Dar
daca nu vrem sau nu putem spune adevarul asa cum îl simtim, asumându-ne riscul de a fi neîntelesi sau gresit întelesi, atunci mai bine sa nu spunem nimic. Nu putem (dis)cerne noi în locul altcuiva, nu putem, pentru altcineva, sa separam neghina de bobul de grâu si sa-l punem pe fiecare în sacul sau. Vorba cântecului: “Nu
te-oi minti tu niciodata, nici altii a te minti nu pot”.

06/04/2010

Ne raspunde Dumnezeu la rugaciuni?

Filed under: PENTRU MINTE — afractalus @ 14:42
Tags: , , ,

„Cum sa ne rugam… în asa fel încât sa ne fie ascultate rugaciunile
Ai cunoscut vreodata pe cineva care sa se încreada în Dumnezeu din toata inima? Când nu credeam în Dumnezeu, aveam o prietena buna care se ruga adesea lui Dumnezeu. Ei bine, în fiecare saptamâna îmi spunea despre o dificultate sau un lucru din viata ei pe care îl încredinta în grija lui Dumnezeu. Si, invariabil, în fiecare saptamâna eram martora la un lucru neobisnuit facut de Dumnezeu ca raspuns la rugaciunea ei din acea saptamâna. Nici nu-ti poti închipui cât de greu îi este unui ateu sa fie nevoit sa constate acest lucru saptamâna de saptamâna! Dupa o vreme, nu mai merge sa argumentezi ca totul este o „coincidenta”… Dar de ce îi asculta Dumnezeu rugaciunile prietenei mele? Motivul principal: fiindca ea avea o relatie cu El si voia sa faca voia Lui. Si, într-adevar, ea asculta ce îi spunea Dumnezeu. Considera ca El are dreptul de a o îndruma în viata si ea chiar se bucura ca asa stau lucrurile! De aceea atunci când se ruga în legatura cu diferite lucruri, facea ceva firesc, data fiind legatura ei cu Dumnezeu. Venea la Dumnezeu cu toata încrederea si-I vorbea despre nevoile, despre îngrijorarile ei si despre orice altceva se întâmpla în viata ei. În plus, din ceea ce citise în Biblie, se convinsese ca Dumnezeu dorea ca ea sa se bizuie pe El în acest mod. Mai exact, viata ei demonstra ceea ce spune versetul acesta din Sfânta Scriptura: „Îndrazneala pe care o avem la El este ca daca cerem ceva dupa voia Lui, ne asculta.”1 „Caci ochii Domnului sunt peste cei neprihaniti, si urechile Lui iau aminte la rugaciunile lor…”2

Atunci cum se face ca Dumnezeu nu ia aminte la rugaciunile tuturor oamenilor?
Poate deoarece nu toti oamenii au o legatura personala cu El… Or fi stiind ei ca exista Dumnezeu, poate chiar I se închina din când în când. Cât despre cei care nu ar sa primeasca niciodata raspuns la rugaciunile lor… probabil ca lucrurile stau astfel din cauza ca nu au o relatie personala cu Dumnezeu si, mai mult, niciodata nu au primit de la Dumnezeu iertarea completa pentru pacatele lor. Te întrebi ce legatura are una cu alta?! Îti explic imediat. „Nu, mâna Domnului nu este prea scurta a sa mântuiasca, nici urechea Lui prea tare ca sa auda, ci nelegiuirile voastre pun un zid de despartire între voi si Dumnezeul vostru; pacatele voastre va ascund Fata Lui si-L împiedica sa v-asculte!”3 Este destul de normal sa simtim aceasta despartire de Dumnezeu. Ce se întâmpla de obicei când oamenii încep sa-L roage ceva pe Dumnezeu? Îsi încep rugaciunea astfel: „Doamne, am mare nevoie sa ma ajuti cu problema asta…” Apoi fac o pauza si reiau: „Sunt constient de faptul ca nu sunt o persoana perfecta… ca, de fapt, nu am nici un drept sa Te rog acest lucru…” Iata, oamenii îsi dau seama ca sunt pacatosi… si îsi mai dau seama ca nu doar ei îsi dau seama de acest lucru, ci si Dumnezeu! Si atunci se gândesc: „Hei, pe cine caut eu sa pacalesc?” Însa ceea ce s-ar putea sa nu stie ei… este cum pot primi de la Dumnezeu iertarea pentru toate pacatele. E posibil sa nu stie ca pot începe o relatie cu Dumnezeu si ca atunci Dumnezeu îi va auzi… Va lua aminte la rugaciunile lor.”

Scumpa mea, oare nu stiu sa ma rog? Oare rugaciunile mele nu sunt din suflet? Chiar nu stiu sa-L primesc pe Dumnezeu? Sau, poate, ceea ce cer este ceva profund gresit ?

Scumpi, poti citi tot articolul aici.


Pagina următoare »

Blog la WordPress.com.

%d blogeri au apreciat asta: